Billy Graham's Literary Legacy

The life and legacy of Billy Graham is front and center as national and Christian media report the passing of the world-famous evangelist at the age of 99. Over the span of his 70 plus years of ministry, Graham always characterized himself first and foremost as an evangelist. As he wrote in the preface to his 1997 memoir, Just As I Am, “an evangelist is one sent by God to announce the Gospel, the Good News.”

Billy Graham will remembered most for announcing the Good News of the Gospel through his crusades. Over a span of nearly six decades, the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association conducted more than 400 crusades in 185 countries and territories on six continents. It is estimated that Graham preached in person to over 200 million people.

As important as the crusades were to the life and ministry of Mr. Graham, there’s another dimension to his legacy that will continue to carry on his life’s work, and that’s his writing. Graham was a prolific author with 34 books to his credit, many of them best sellers.

continue reading

First and Second Things

In the Olympics as in life, coming in second is nice, but it’s nothing like being first. We remember gold medalists but quickly forget who took the silver. Ricky Bobby from Talladega Nights speaks for all those whothink first is best when he says, “If you ain’t first you’re last.”

If there’s an exception to this “It’s Best to Be First” principle, it’s one made popular by the outstanding “I Am Second” campaign—currently featuring Olympic gold medalist Scott Hamilton—where the message echoes the ubiquitous HE>i slogan from a clothing brand based on the Bible verse John 3:30: “HE (Jesus) must increase, but I must decrease.”

Which is why it’s puzzling that so many of us who call ourselves Christians put second (that would be us) ahead of first (that would be God). To be fair, it’s not like we think we’re more important or better than God, but that doesn't stop us from taking a shot at first place. So we trumpet a passion we have for a cause and make that our first priority. You know, good causes like caring for the poor, helping the disadvantaged, giving voice to marginalized voices, those sorts of things.

continue reading

Dealing With Doubt About God

Why do people doubt God? Some doubt God exists, others doubt he cares all that much about us, and some question his very goodness. If you have doubts about God, you’re in good company. Everyone from the disciples of Jesus to 20th century saints have had their doubts about God in one way or another.

In fact, if you’ve never had doubts, you probably haven’t thought all that much about your faith. Even more importantly, if you’ve never doubted God, you probably haven’t grown all that much as a Christian.

Fuller Theological Seminary conducted a study of young adults who left church after high school. The researchers came to this conclusion: “The more college students felt they had the opportunity to express their doubt while they were in high school, the higher [their] level of faith maturity and spiritual maturity” (www.fulleryouthinstitute.org/college-transition).

continue reading

A Thorough Guide to the Non-Canonical Gospels

Many years ago, when I first became interested in Christianity, I encountered a book at a local bookstore entitled, The Lost Books of the Bible. As a new investigator of the claims of the New Testament, I was immediately intrigued. “What?” I thought, “There are books about Jesus that were lost?” I couldn’t help but wonder what these books said about Jesus and why they were allegedly “lost” in the first place. I bought the book and bean to research the historical texts it described. I was disappointed to discover that the book should have been titled, The Well Known, Late Lies About Jesus That Were Ignored By Christians Who Knew Better. These texts were never part of the New Testament canon. They were written late in history and rejected by everyone who knew the truth about Jesus of Nazareth.

continue reading

Consider Jesus

You who share in a heavenly calling, consider Jesus…

Tucked into the Letter to the Hebrews are two words that provide the highest calling and most compelling mandate a Christian can have. These words comprise the central theme of Hebrews and perhaps the entire Bible. They also serve as a guide for living.

Consider Jesus.

We know Jesus, at least in the sense of knowing who he is: God’s only Son sent to earth to bring light and life and salvation to people living in darkness.

Consider Jesus.

But what do we do with Jesus? Once we have put our trust in Him and accepted Him, how do we live? Is there more to a relationship with the Son of God than trust and acceptance? We call ourselves Christians because of a relationship to Jesus, but have we truly considered Him? What does that even mean?

continue reading

What Happens to Our Souls When We Die?

There are many good reasons to believe we, as humans, are more than simply physical bodies. Humans are “soulish” creatures; we are living souls united to physical bodies. Even without the guidance of Scripture, there are good reasons to believe our lives will not end at the point of our physical death. The existence of an afterlife is reasonable, particularly given our dual nature as immaterial souls possessing physical bodies. But what precisely happens to each of us, as living souls, when our physical bodies cease to exist? What will we experience the moment we close our eyes for the last time in this temporal life? The Christian worldview offers an answer to this question, and it can be found by surveying the teaching of the New Testament:

continue reading

Living with Camus Isn't Bad at All

On this day, January 4, in 1960, Albert Camus died in a car crash. That’s the bad news.

The good news: he isn’t bad to live with today.

In a 2010, Economist article, we read that “History finds Camus on the right side of so many of the great moral issues of the 20th century. He joined the French resistance to combat Nazism, editing an underground newspaper, Combat. He campaigned against the death penalty. A one-time Communist, his anti-totalitarian work, “L'Homme Révolté” (“The Rebel”), published in 1951, was remarkably perceptive about the evils of Stalinism. It also led to his falling-out with Sartre, who at the time was still defending the Soviet Union and refusing to condemn the gulags”.

In my own copy of The Stranger by Camus, I have a few things underlined.

The Best Book of the Year

It’s the time of year for those “Best of” lists. You know the ones. Best movies of the year, best technology gadgets, best books of the year, and so on. I work in the area of book publishing, so the book lists are the ones I follow closely.

There are so many book lists out there that it’s difficult to identify a single title as the undisputed Book of the Year. If you go by Amazon, which sells 42 percent of all the books in the world, the “most read” book in 2017was A Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. According to Goodreads, the most popular book was Into the Water by Paula Hawkins.

Christianity Today named Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Harrison Warren as its Book of the Year, a selection I completely agree with. It’s an extraordinary book. In the world of Christian fiction, The Christy Award™ Book of the Year was presented to Charles Martin’s Long Way Gone. Another fine choice.

continue reading

So This Is Christmas

One of the wonders of Christmas is its light. In the Northern Hemisphere, Christmas Day comes just a few days after the winter solstice, the “bleak midwinter,” the longest night of the year. We should be depressed by the darkness. Instead we revel in it because of the glorious light all around—on trees, on houses, in stores and public places. We light candles and stoke fireplaces so we can enjoy their warmth and light.

When it’s the darkest, light is a gift from the one who created it. As recorded in Scripture, these are the first words God spoke: “Let there be light.” By that simple yet all-powerful command enough light came to brighten and give life to our otherwise dark and empty planet.

Since that first day of creation, darkness has remained, not only in the world but also in the human heart. When the prophet Isaiah described the people as “walking in darkness,” he didn’t mean they were physically in the dark. They were spiritually bleak and without hope.

continue reading

Five Reasons You Can Trust the Story of Christmas Is True (Free Bible Insert)

Detectives create lists. As a cold-case detective, I’m no different. When investigating an event in the distant past (in my case, an unsolved murder), I collect evidence, make lists and do my best to reach the most reasonable inference. When I began to investigate Christianity at the age of thirty-five, I approached the gospels the same way I approached my cold-case files. Lists were an important part of the process. One New Testament claim was particularly interesting to me: the conception and birth of Jesus. When I first read through the gospels, the birth narratives seemed incredible and unreasonable. I’m not the only person to express such a concern. In an article posted in the Herald Scotland, Reverend Andrew Frater called the Nativity story a “fanciful, fairy tale” and called on Christians to “disentangle the truth from the tinsel”. Frater is a minister and a believer, and even he doesn’t believe in the virgin conception of Jesus. As an atheist, I was even more skeptical. I rejected supernatural claims altogether, and the first Biblical claim about Jesus was a supernatural one. But as I collected the evidence and formed my lists, I found there were many good reasons to trust the story of Christmas. I’ve assembled them here with links to longer treatments of each topic:

continue reading
Syndicate content

Popular Blogs


Sign-up for the Newsletter
Sign-up for the Newsletter
Get the latest updates on relevant news topics, engaging blogs and new site features. We're not annoying about it, so don't worry.